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Factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency
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Factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency

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Factor XII deficiency is an inherited disorder that affects a protein (factor XII) involved in blood clotting.

When you bleed, the body a series of reactions takes place to help the blood clot. This is called the coagulation cascade. Factor XII is a special protein, called a coagulation factor, which helps in this process.

Each factor in the process triggers the next reaction. The final product is the blood clot. There is a higher chance of excess bleeding when one or more of these clotting factors are missing.

A lack of factor XII does not cause you to bleed abnormally. However, the blood takes longer than normal to clot in a test tube.

Factor XII deficiency is a rare inherited disorder.

I Would Like to Learn About:

  • Causes

    When you bleed, the body a series of reactions takes place to help the blood clot. This is called the coagulation cascade. Factor XII is a special protein, called a coagulation factor, which helps in this process.

    Each factor in the process triggers the next reaction. The final product is the blood clot. There is a higher chance of excess bleeding when one or more of these clotting factors are missing.

    A lack of factor XII does not cause you to bleed abnormally. However, the blood takes longer than normal to clot in a test tube.

    Factor XII deficiency is a rare inherited disorder.

  • Symptoms

    There are usually no symptoms.

  • Exams and Tests

    Factor XII deficiency is most often found when clotting tests are done for routine screening.

    Tests may include:

    • Factor XII assay
    • Partial thromboplastin time (PTT)
    • Mixing study
  • Treatment

    Treatment is usually not needed.

  • Outlook (Prognosis)

    The outcome is expected to be good without treatment.

  • Possible Complications

    There are usually no complications.

  • When to Contact a Medical Professional

    The health care provider usually discovers this condition when running other lab tests.

  • Prevention

    This is an inherited disorder. There is no known way to prevent it.

Related Information

     

References

Gailani D, Neff AT. Rare coagulation factor deficiencies. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2012:chap 139.

Kessler C. Hemorrhagic disorders: Coagulation factor deficiencies. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 180.

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Review Date: 3/3/2013  

Reviewed By: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.

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