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B-cell leukemia/lymphoma panel
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B-cell leukemia/lymphoma panel

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B lymphocyte cell surface markers

B-cell leukemia/lymphoma panel is a blood test that looks for certain proteins on the surface of white blood cells called B-lymphocytes. The proteins serve as markers that may be helpful in diagnosing leukemia or lymphoma.

I Would Like to Learn About:

  • How the Test is Performed

    A blood sample is needed.

    In some cases, white blood cells are removed during a bone marrow biopsy. The sample may also be taken during a lymph node biopsy or other biopsy when lymphoma is suspected.

    The blood sample is sent to a laboratory, where a specialist checks the cell type and characteristics. This procedure is called immunophenotyping. The test is usually done using a technique called flow cytometry.

  • How to Prepare for the Test

    No special preparation is usually necessary.

  • How the Test will Feel

    When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some persons feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon goes away.

  • Why the Test is Performed

    This test may be done for the following reasons:

    • When other tests (such as a blood smear) show signs of abnormal white blood cells
    • When leukemia or lymphoma is suspected
    • To find out the type of leukemia or lymphoma
  • What Abnormal Results Mean

    • B-cell lymphocytic leukemia
    • Lymphoma
  • Risks

    Veins and arteries vary in size from one patient to another and from one side of the body to the other. Obtaining a blood sample from some people may be more difficult than from others.

    Other risks associated with having blood drawn are slight, but may include:

    • Excessive bleeding
    • Fainting or feeling light-headed
    • Hematoma (blood accumulating under the skin)
    • Infection (a slight risk any time the skin is broken)

Related Information

  Acute lymphoblasti...     Acute lymphocytic ...

References

Czuchlewski DR, Viswanatha DS, Larson RS. Molecular diagnosis of hematopoietic neoplasms. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 22nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 75.

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Review Date: 3/23/2014  

Reviewed By: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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